Light at the end of the loom…

Got a few more hours with the car on Monday, and the huge tangle of wires from last week is starting to actually look like something resembling some organization.

Next up is moving the fuse box block from the engine bay into the spot now vacated by what was formerly the BCM’s fusebox, and relocating the ECU inside the passenger compartment as well.

Then will be the tricky step of ensuring that all of the sensors still needed inside the cockpit – OBDII, dash, throttle pedal, brake pedal, still have the power they need, as well as powering the ECU fuseblock and wiring up a starter lead.

So far so good.  We’ll know how badly this has gone in probably six months time 😉

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Teardown Continued…

Teardown of the car is continuing, albeit a little bit slowly.

The heater core is now gone, and I’ve completely de-wired the car.  Dash bar is gone, and so the only bit left to remove is the steering wheel support and the padding/heat shielding behind it.

Next comes removing the BCM and all associated wiring from the car to simplify the wiring as much as possible.  All that really remains is the dash connector, accelerator pedal, brake light switch, and the OBDII port.  Just about everything else NOT in the PCM harness goes away.

Will see if this car will actually start when it all goes back together…

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Replacement Rear Shock Clevis

From the factory, there are lots of soft bushings in the rear suspension.  Like most, I’ve replaced the bushings with poly.  However, for the bolt that holds the rear shock lower clevis, the lack of flex in the bushings can lead to the suspension binding somewhat if you use the factory torque spec of 8 billion foot pounds.

Folks have used various approaches over the years to alleviate this – replacing the M16 bolt with a pin, secured with cotter keys or snap pins etc.  Hardbar has made some parts for this over the years as well.

I decided to go an easier route and source parts from McMaster:

  1. 130mm M16x2 socket head cap screw: http://www.mcmaster.com/#91290a848/=wk2iv3
  2. M16x2 castle nuts: http://www.mcmaster.com/#93760a328/=wk2iut
  3. Banski Motorsports shock bushings front and rear:  https://www.banskimotorsports.com/Pin_Top_Shock_Mounts.html

The clevis on the Penskes is a bit wider than the OEM side – about 85mm, and since the bolt spec shows about 45mm of thread, 130-45 = 85mm of grip length, which the OEM bolts did not have.  So, this solves two problems.

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LG Motorsports Tie Rods

As part of installing the coils, I decided to install the LG Motorsports HD tie rod kit.  The OE tie rod is really close to a coil spring over the shock, and the Zip Corvette tie rods that folks offset made me pretty nervous – the “single-shear conversion” didn’t quite sit well with me.  Here are some shots from the LG Install:

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